My notes and ramblings, normally about automation

VMware has released a brand-new, and open-sourced, way to manage your vSphere environment. The Desired State Configuration (DSC) Resources for VMware lets us apply standard configuration management processes through PowerShell DSC and PowerCLI! Let’s take a walk through how we can get started using these DSC resources and apply our first configuration! Desired State Configuration Resources for VMware Overview PowerShell DSC has been out for a while, since Windows Server 2012 R2 as a matter of fact.

There was an interesting ask the other day about whether or not PowerCLI could configure an ESXi host’s «Host Graphics Settings». I haven’t done much with GPUs, so this was the perfect reason to dig in to something new! If you were to modify this setting in the UI, it would look something like the following: I knew PowerCLI didn’t have any high-level cmdlets to do this, so it was time to start digging through the API docs to see what was possible.

A recent knowledge base (KB) article was released regarding an issue impacting a specific version of VMware Tools. The KB in question is 57796, which describes the possibility of a guest level network connectivity issues or even a purple diagnostic screen (PSOD). Before getting to the discovery process, I want to cover some of the specifics for this KB. I do this because we’re going to need to be aware of these as we build out our one-liners and the subsequent reporting script.

VMware Cloud on AWS is making a switch to the underlying networking and security platform for the service. This move is being done in order to provide access to services such as distributed firewall, security groups, route-based VPN connections, and more. In order to accomplish this move, SDDCs will be transitioned from NSX-V to NSX-T. More information about this update is available in the following blog post: VMware Cloud on AWS: Advanced Networking and Security with NSX-T SDDC

VMware Cloud on AWS is making a switch to the underlying networking and security platform for the service. This move is being done in order to provide access to services such as distributed firewall, security groups, route-based VPN connections, and more. In order to accomplish this move, SDDCs will be transitioned from NSX-V to NSX-T. More information about this update is available in the following blog post: VMware Cloud on AWS: Advanced Networking and Security with NSX-T SDDC

VMware Cloud on AWS is making a switch to the underlying networking and security platform for the service. This move is being done in order to provide access to services such as distributed firewall, security groups, route-based VPN connections, and more. In order to accomplish this move, SDDCs will be transitioned from NSX-V to NSX-T. More information about this update is available in the following blog post: VMware Cloud on AWS: Advanced Networking and Security with NSX-T SDDC

VMware Cloud on AWS is making a switch to the underlying networking and security platform for the service. This move is being done in order to provide access to services such as distributed firewall, security groups, route-based VPN connections, and more. In order to accomplish this move, SDDCs will be transitioned from NSX-V to NSX-T. More information about this update is available in the following blog post: VMware Cloud on AWS: Advanced Networking and Security with NSX-T SDDC

Something amazing has been added to the vSphere HTML5 Web Client Fling. This new feature is called Code Capture. While the name might not sound familiar, hopefully you’re already acquainted with its predecessor – Onyx Code Capture gives you the ability to take actions you’ve completed in the vSphere Client and outputs usable code. Once you have the vSphere HTML5 Web Client Fling installed, it’s just as simple as hitting the red ‘record’ button on the top menu, performing your activities, then hitting the red ‘stop’ button.

As scary as it is, VMworld is almost here. Last year, many folks joked with me that the only way to find me was to attend one of my sessions… Well, this year is going to be no different. When I log into the VMworld speaker resource center, I’m hit with with 16 sessions! Those are just the ones in the schedule builder! Since I’ll probably be a little scarce around the VM Village area, let’s run down where I’ll be and when!

I blinked and it’s already August. That means it’s almost VMworld time! At VMworld, one of my favorite events is the Hackathon put on by the great folks at VMware {code} for the last couple years. If you haven’t been to one of the VMware {code} Hackathons, the whole idea is to create or join a team and code some kind of idea to fruition! The great part about it is that this event is for everyone.

Did you know the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) has file-based backup options? This ability was actually released in vSphere 6.5. However, there was one feature in particular that was missing: a scheduler. I’m happy to say that as part of vSphere 6.7, the VCSA received a backup scheduler! Recently, Emad Younis released a couple cool walkthroughs to the vSphere Central site to manage file-based backup and restore actions. Under the covers, both of these actions are served up by vSphere’s RESTful APIs and therefore we can use the vSphere Automation SDK for Python to automate these actions!

Did you know the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) has file-based backup options? This ability was actually released in vSphere 6.5. However, there was one feature in particular that was missing: a scheduler. I’m happy to say that as part of vSphere 6.7, the VCSA received a backup scheduler! Recently, my teammate, Emad Younis released a couple cool walkthroughs to the vSphere Central site to manage file-based backup and restore actions.

There’s been a new batch of features released for VMware Cloud on AWS! While there’s a lot of important new features, there’s one in particular I’d like to focus on. This new feature is called Elastic DRS (EDRS). EDRS allows you to automatically right-size your SDDC for the current workload demand and do it all by way of a policy. Even better, there are RESTful APIs to help you automate the configuration of this policy!

Did you know the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) has file-based backup options? This ability was actually released in vSphere 6.5. However, there was one feature in particular that was missing: a scheduler. I’m happy to say that as part of vSphere 6.7, the VCSA received a backup scheduler! Recently, my teammate, Emad Younis released a couple cool walkthroughs to the vSphere Central site to manage file-based backup and restore actions.

Recently, VMware Cloud on AWS announced the ability to create an SDDC with a single host. This is a pretty exciting update, one many of our users have been asking for. Along with the ability to deploy an SDDC in a much smaller footprint, you get access to all the automation and developer resources available such as the built-in Developer Center and the RESTful APIs. In a post on the VMware Code blog, Automating VMware Cloud on AWS One Host SDDC Deployments, some code samples were debuted by Alan Renouf and myself to deploy a single host SDDC using direct REST calls, PowerCLI, and DCLI.

The latest release of VMware Cloud on AWS introduces a brand-new deployment configuration. We can now deploy an SDDC which consists of a single host! This is exciting for many reasons, but biggest reason for me is being able to access all the APIs without occupying the standard minimum SDDC footprint of four hosts. More information on the One Host release is available here: VMware Cloud on AWS – Single Host Access

The latest release of VMware Cloud on AWS introduces a brand-new deployment configuration. We can now deploy an SDDC which consists of a single host! This is exciting for many reasons, but biggest reason for me is being able to access all the APIs without occupying the standard minimum SDDC footprint of four hosts. More information on the One Host release is available here: VMware Cloud on AWS – Single Host Access

Datacenter CLI (DCLI) 2.9.1 has been released and the new features are fantastic! One of the key new updates is how we install this new version of DCLI. In the past, DCLI was installed as part of vSphere CLI (vCLI). In this current version, DCLI is installed through the Python Package Index (PyPI) using pip. PyPI is the official, third-party, online repository for Python packages. Pip is a package management system which handles the installation process of Python packages from repositories like PyPI.

vSphere 6.7 was released a couple weeks ago and there were a ton of new features announced. However, there was one feature I was particularly interested in and that was Per-VM EVC (Enhanced vMotion Compatibility). Giving a brief, high-level overview, EVC can be used to set a baseline of CPU features available to a VM or a set of VMs. In the past, this was a cluster-based setting. It was really nice because you could take hosts which didn’t have the same CPUs, use EVC to apply a common CPU baseline, and still put them in a cluster to take advantage of features like DRS and HA.

PowerCLI 10.0.0 was released just a few weeks ago and one of the key updates was the added support for MacOS and Linux operating systems. It’s still amazing to think about! PowerShell and PowerCLI available to users on OSes other than just Windows. Wow! Let’s put this to action and get PowerCLI installed on a MacOS system. Prerequisite: Installing PowerShell Core – Package The minimally required version for MacOS is PowerShell Core 6.